Investigators:

1: catalyze abrisamento 2: perform technical poetics 3: who plot together to bring about a positive and effective change 4: identify new meanings, new poetries that exist in the interstice and discovers their names 5: engage in regular exchange with other members of Laboratory 6: engage in specific projects propelled by questions that exist at the intersections of intellectual boundaries




Investigators

Katherine E. BashKatherine E. Bash

Katherine E. Bash,
Founder and Principal Investigator

Inquiry

Spatial Poetries: Heuristics for Experimental Poiesis

The theme of my research is the study of how things take form in experience, consciousness and language. In large part, it explores the identification and the naming of ephemeral event phenomena that are as of yet unnamed, a process of becoming I describe as symmetry-breaking. This exploration is pursued within the framework of a Lived Spatial Inquiry called Experimental Poiesis, a particularly experimental form of making where inquiry is the formal philosophical and poietic tool where the original matrix of the site in question is embedded in what is made. The methods of this inquiry facilitate both the study and the subversion of normal habits of language-focused perception and are called Heuristics—experimental aesthetic practices that are site-adjustable and engaged iteratively, where the results of one experiment become the starting point of the next. Thus it is iterative. Spatial Poetries, the artwork products are also the results of the engagement of Heuristics. They are hybrid in form and prompt shifts in lived experience in the viewers/readers/co-participants.

The Atlas of Experimental Poiesis is a compression of the investigations into a map that acts as a guide to observing and contriving a process of symmetry breaking and symmetry restoration in a time irreversible process.

Bio

Born in Texas and living in London, Katherine E. Bash has received degrees in biology (BA) and design (MFA) from the University of Texas and a Ph.D. in Architecture from UCL. She is Founder and Principal Investigator of the Itinerant Laboratory for Perceptual Inquiry, she engages the possibilities of creating new language as creative analysis of place.

Contact

abrisamento (at) katherinebash.com
www.katherinebash.com

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Ole Peters,
Investigator

Inquiry

Inspirations from Phase Transitions

Phase transitions in physical systems continue to pose unsolved scientific problems. For the last 200 years the field has been extremely fruitful, inspiring basic conceptual advances alongside the development of abstract mathematical techniques. The Laboratory for Perceptual Inquiry provides a framework for reflection -- is it a linguistic illusion that a concept like "universality by simplicity" has applications outside the field of phase transitions? My answer is a tentative no.

ILPI Disseminations

Bio

Ole has worked for various academic institutions and is currently most intrigued by atmospheric convection and the pretty shapes of clouds. He is generally in good humor and is supportive of any effort of using one's brains. Bad journalism, corruption, and a lack of appreciation for numbers can make him furious. His favorite numeral system is the unary one because it is more intuitive and people don't understand logarithms. He reads good books and tries to stay sane by spending a lot of time in the ocean.

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Michael Witmore

Michael Witmore,
Investigator

Inquiry

States of Readiness and the History of Poise

I am interested in philosophers, dramatists and visual artists who deal with states of "still-motion" -- instants in which an individual is both moving and at rest. The history of poise comprises the changing collection of ways in which individuals -- at different historical moments -- have readied themselves for "whatever happens," striking a posture that allows them to accommodate sudden changes of circumstance in the blink of an eye. This capacity for sudden tactical revision or dynamic self-correction was a virtue in the Renaissance, which is the period where I do my academic work, but it is also an ability that is cultivated in a number of contemporary artistic or cultural practices (for example, body contact improvisation in modern dance). Currently I am conducting a historical investigation into the nature of the "instant," which in the seventeenth century is the indispensable pivot concept for thinking about the non-uniform acceleration of bodies, the temporal interval of "wit," and the lifespan of an act of the will (what Hobbes called "conatus").

Bio

Michael Witmore, scholar of English Renaissance Studies, literary critic and musician who has lived on both coasts of the U.S. and several places in between, is Director of the Folger Shakespeare Library. His recent publication is a collaboration with photographer Rosamund Purcell that explores the transcendent emotion in and subversive effects of Shakespeare's language; it is entitled, Landscapes of the Passing Strange: Reflections from Shakespeare (2010). He is also the author of Shakespearean Metaphysics (Continuum, 2008), Culture of Accidents: Unexpected Knowledges in Early Modern England (Stanford, 2001) and Pretty Creatures: Children and Fiction in the English Renaissance (Cornell 2007).

ILPI Disseminations



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Et Alia

Eu Jin Chua,
Eu Jin ChuaEu Jin Chua, by Katherine E. BashFellow

Bio

Eu Jin Chua is a PhD candidate at the University of London. He currently directs the Master of Design programme at the Unitec school of Design and Visual Arts in Auckland, New Zealand, and is lecturer in art and design theory there. The title of his doctoral dissertation, 'The Cinematic Expression of Nature: Reading Film Theory after Political Ecology', indicates something of his current research interests. He has additional interests in artists' film and video, modern and contemporary art, and critical theory (he originally trained to be an architect). He has published in Postmodern Culture, Screening the Past, The Bryn Mawr Review of Comparative Literature, and in various books and exhibition catalogues, and he has curated or co-curated a number of exhibitions in London and New Zealand. He is an Associate Editor of the Moving Image Review and Art Journal, a scholarly journal on artists' film and video.


 

 

 

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Catherine Dossin,
Historiographer and President of the Board

Bio

Catherine DossinCatherine Dossin

Catherine Dossin is an assistant professor at Purdue University, where she teaches courses on modern and contemporary art in the United States, Europe, and Latin America. Originally from France she received her Master’s degree from the Sorbonne and her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.

Her research areas encompasses to the geopolitics of the art world, the history of art history, and cultural transfers in the second part of the 20th century. Her work has been published in Woman’s Art Journal, American Art Journal, Visual Resources, and several edited collections. She just completed a manuscript tentatively titled Geopolitics of the Western Art World, 1940s-1980s. From the Fall of Paris to the Invasion of New York.

Interested in the contribution of quantitative and cartographic analysis, Catherine Dossin is a founding members of Artl@s, a research project launched in 2009 by Dr. Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel at the Ecole normale supérieure de Paris (rue d’Ulm). In order to present Artl@s, and its methods that they define a Spatial (Digital) History, Dossin and Prunel have published articles and organized colloquia and conferences in France and the United States, including The Spaces of Arts (Purdue, 2012), to which the ILPI participated. She is the President of EPCAF (European Postwar and Contemporary Art Forum), a professional association that brings together art historians from all over the world working on European art.



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